Men’s Health

When it comes to prevention and early detection, men’s health often takes a back seat to women’s health. Research, however, shows that, compared to women, men are more likely to smoke and drink alcohol and generally lead less healthy lifestyles. In addition, men are more likely to put off routine check-ups and also delay seeing a healthcare provider for symptoms of a health problem. Compared to working-aged women, working-aged men are also less likely to have a regular doctor.

Fortunately, many of the health conditions and diseases that men face can be prevented or treated – if found early. In order to start taking better care of their health, it is important for men to understand their risk factors and how they can improve their overall health. The most common conditions affecting men – heart disease, prostate, testicular, and colon cancer, and osteoporosis later in life – have important nutritional implications and respond very well to herbal medicine and an integrated approach.

Erectile Dysfunction (ED)


Erectile dysfunction, or ED, is the most common sex problem that men report to their doctor. It affects as many as 30 million men.
ED is defined as trouble getting or keeping an erection that’s firm enough for sex. Though it’s not rare for a man to have some problems with erections from time to time, ED that is progressive or happens routinely with sex is not normal, and it should be treated.

ED can happen:

  • Most often when blood flow in the penis is limited or nerves are harmed
  • With stress or emotional reasons
  • As an early warning of a more serious illness, like: atherosclerosis (hardening or blocked arteries), heart disease, high blood pressure or high blood sugar from Diabetes

Finding the cause(s) of your ED will help treat the problem and help with your overall well-being. As a rule, what’s good for your heart health is good for your sex health. Emotional factors will also be taken into consideration as well as nutrition and lifestyle factors. Treatment will be personalised for each patient.


If you would like to book an appointment

Contact Deborah’s Medical Secretary for an appointment

Low Libido


Low libido describes a decreased interest in sexual activity.

It’s common to lose interest in sex from time to time, and libido levels vary through life. It’s also normal for your interest not to match your partner’s at times. However, low libido for a long period of time may cause concern for some people. It can sometimes be an indicator of an underlying health condition.

Any number of things, some physical and some psychological can underly this symptom. Sometimes it’s both.

Physical issues that can cause low libido include low testosterone, prescription medicines, too little or too much exercise, and alcohol and drug use. Psychological issues can include depression, stress, and problems in your relationship.

Depending on the cause, possible treatments include:

  • Healthier lifestyle choices. Improve your diet, get regular exercise and enough sleep, cut down on the alcohol, and reduce stress.
  • Tapering off any unseeded medication (under supervision) if the one you’re on is affecting your libido
  • Boosting testosterone levels naturally
  • Counselling if emotional factors are involved

If you would like to book an appointment

Contact Deborah’s Medical Secretary for an appointment